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Vendredi 6 novembre 2015 visite-découverte à la MDJ de 60 étudiants accompagnés de leur professeur Stany LARDEUR, de l’Institut universitaire de technologie du Littoral Côte d’Opale, site de Saint-Omer, Département Gestion Administrative et Commerciale des Organisations de Longuenesse.

Rencontre-échange avec les journalistes Gulasal KAMOLOVA (Ouzbékistan) et Mortaza BEHBOUDI (Afghanistan).

Dans le cadre du partenariat avec le Washington Post, la MDJ publie ci-dessous les interviews vidéos des journalistes de la Maison des journalistes.

sirine« Now I’m not able to live safely in any country that has Islamists, because my life is at risk. » (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Tunisia. Sirine Amari is a Tunisian war correspondent who covered conflict in Libya for France 24. After receiving threats from Muslim extremist groups, she fled to Paris, where she was supported by La Maison des Journalistes, a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to exiled journalists.

bassel“They harassed and threatened us.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Syria. When his hometown of Homs came under siege, Bassel Tawil picked up a camera and photographed the Syrian war. His work has been published by Agence France-Presse, Getty, the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, Newsweek and other media outlets. When he tried to leave Homs, he was detained and beaten for 10 days. He eventually escaped to Lebanon and then fled to France. He a founding member of Lens of a Young Homsi, a photography collective that continues to document the destruction of Homs.

makaila“Reporters are not free to speak out against the government.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Chad. Makaila Nguebla is a prominent blogger from Chad. He wrote critically about Chadian President Idriss Deby, who has been in power since 1990. In 2005, he fled to Senegal, where he ran a radio show and continued to blog. In 2013, Reporters without Borders and Amnesty International helped Nguebla seek asylum in France. He lives at the La Maison des Journalistes, a Paris-based nonprofit that provides assistance to exiled journalists including housing.

burundi“The authorities did not want the journalists to talk about it.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Burundi. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, at least 100 reporters have fled Burundi in the past year as press freedom deteriorates in the country. The broadcast journalist, who asked to remain anonymous to protect her family, sought asylum in France after receiving death threats on her phone. Since she left the country, African Public Radio, where she worked, was attacked, set on fire and forced to close. In France, she was granted a spot at the La Maison des Journalistes, a Paris-based nonprofit that provides assistance to exiled journalists including housing.

gulasal“Even [as] my life was in danger, I continued to do my work.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Uzbekistan. Gulasal Kamolova worked as a TV news reporter in Uzbekistan for 12 years before joining Radio Free Europe. After blogging critical views of the government, she was questioned and threatened by the local authorities. She now lives in France.

tarek“We could only write under the dictations of the regime.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Syria. Tarek Sheikh Moussa was arrested in Syria for his critical views of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. He went to Jordan, where he worked for local TV stations and reported on events in Syria. He was unsafe in Jordan and eventually fled to France, where he received support from La Maison des Journalistes.

nabil“The Middle East … has become a place of weapons and not a place of pens.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Syria. Nabil Shofan is a broadcast journalist from Homs. After Syrian authorities accused him of treason he fled to Jordan. There he worked for local TV and radio stations covering Syria. He now lives in Paris, where he contributes to several Arabic-language media outlets including Alaan TV and Rozana Radio. Shofan was a founding member of the Syrian Center for Press Freedom.

iyad“In June 2013, my house got raided.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Syria. Iyad Abdallah is a writer and philosopher. He is a founding editor of Al-Jumhuriya, Study of the Syrian Revolution, where he wrote critically of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. After an interrogation, his home in Damascus was raided and he fled to Lebanon. There, the French Embassy helped him travel to France, where he was assisted by La Maison des Journalistes.

cherif“I keep doing my work because we simply cannot yield.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Guinea Conakry. Sekou Cherif Diallo’s blog “Another Guinea is Possible” focuses on political violence in that country. He was forced to flee his homeland in December 2013 because of his work assisting the European Union monitoring the country’s legislative elections. He now lives in France where he is supported by La Maison des Journalistes a Paris-based nonprofit that provides assistance to exiled journalists.

mourad“[Journalists] are seen as people to bring down or silence.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Algeria. Mourad Hammami is a Berber broadcast journalist who worked for several media outlets in Algeria, including Expression, Liberte, La Dépêche de Kabylie, Le Jeune Independent and Berber Television. After receiving threats, he fled in 2013 to France, where he has been receiving support from La Maison des Journalistes.

behzad“There were government officials and powerful figures who did not want us to succeed in our mission and reach our goals.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Afghanistan. Behzad Qayomzada was a member of the Afghanistan National Journalists’ Union. He was trained by the Nai-Supporting Open Media in Afghanistan, a nongovernmental organization that works locally to empower independent media and promote freedom of expression. Just around the time that he began focusing his reporting on women’s rights in Afghanistan, he began to receive anonymous death threats. He fled to France in 2011, where he was supported by La Maison des Journalistes, a Paris-based nonprofit that helps exiled journalists.

raafat“The Saudi General Intelligence arrested me because of my reporting.” (Cliquez ici pour voir la vidéo)
Syria. Raafat Alghanem grew up in Saudi Arabia. He was imprisoned for two years for blogging critically of the Saudi government. After being released from prison in 2011, he was sent to Syria, where he filmed and wrote about the Syrian revolution. For that work, he was imprisoned in Syria. When he was released, he fled to Jordan and now lives in France.